Thursday, June 21, 2007

Praising God?

I'm curious what the usefulness or value of praising God is? It seems it can't be that God needs the praise. So, is the act of praising God of benefit to us? And if so, of what benefit?

11 comments:

Mystic Wing said...

Praising God isn't about flattering some entity who obviously shouldn't be in need of flattery.

It represents a focus of attention on a unified state of mind, a dedication to enlightened consciousness. It's an allegorical concept, in other words.

Ashwin said...

From what I've heard, everything the Judeo-Christian does, is for glory. He created mankind to praise him and live their life glorifying Him alone.

decrepitoldfool said...

And yet, ashwin, not necessarily deserving of that glory.

decrepitoldfool said...

Whoops, sorry Ashwin, that was a clumsy sentence! I didn't mean to imply that was your viewpoint, only that I was answering your comment.

Ashwin said...

I would have assumed no ill will to begin with, but I'm glad you took the time to clear that up. Thank you.

Back to the topic, I'm not sure what Paul means by "praising God"? Is it the automatic response of "Thank God you're alright!" or a conscious one?

decrepitoldfool said...

Paul the Apostle meant a conscious act of praising God - actually the reason for our existence, to stand around in a choir and tell God how great He is. Don't know about Paul the Cafe' guy. ;-)

Paul said...

Hi Mystic!

Would you say that "praising god" is a form of meditation?

Paul said...

Hi DOF!

I'm not sure I will ever understand Paul the Apostle's notion of the good afterlife. Sitting around all day praising and worshiping God? How could that be blissful?

Paul said...

Hi Ashwin,

I think the Judeo-Christian notion of giving glory to god alone is a bit political. That's to say, my hunch is the priests advocated it as a way of upping their own status. But I could be wrong about that.

Mystic Wing said...

Paul:

Yes, that's one way of putting it. Praising God is a form of meditation.

Patty said...

"God needs praise," is an ambiguous phrase, though.

If my Ultimate Burger from the cafeteria is truly magnificent in all possibly measures that I could apply to it, then it needs praise, too.